カテゴリー別アーカイブ: 随筆

Essay Pressing to Save a Life
— An emergency medical encounter by a shiatsu therapist —

Tomochika Eto
Fitness trainer, Meiji University

1.Introduction

Sports trainer is listed on the Japan Shiatsu College website as a possible career path for graduates of the college.

 In my case, though what I do may be slightly different than what most people imagine when they think of a sports trainer, I do make my living as a trainer of sorts. In 2001 I was working as a supervisor of teaching assistance operations for physical education, and I entered the Japan Shiatsu College with the objective of developing a more rounded program (and also hoping I may be able to set up a clinic at the university). After graduating and obtaining certification, I continued mainly to supervise teaching assistance operations at the university. My duties included implementing fitness testing, results aggregation, resolution, and interpretation, training supervision, explanation of equipment usage, and so on. It may seem as if I was not making use of my shiatsu skills, but there was a time when I was not so busy with my work at the university that I practiced home care shiatsu after finishing work at the university. I also employed shiatsu on various student athletes to help them with shoulder and back problems.

 Here I would like to report on an incident that occurred during those everyday activities in which the physical skills and knowledge I acquired through my training in shiatsu pressure application helped in an emergency lifesaving situation. Normally life is uneventful and we have few encounters with people in a life and death situation, but I hope that my experience will be instructive for anyone who should find themselves in such a situation.

2.Circumstances of the incident

 The incident occurred one day in October 2012 in a class that began at four in the afternoon. That day I was performing support work as usual, dividing the students into several groups to measure side-to-side jumping. Side-to-side jumping is an agility test which measures how many times the subject is able to jump over or onto three lines drawn one meter apart in 20 seconds.

 Just as the buzzer on the timer sounded to signify the end of the test, one of the students collapsed. Since he had been stepping energetically until immediately before falling, his momentum caused him to fall flat on the floor without breaking his fall, as if a switch had been turned off inside him. I was standing behind the students operating the timer. As I watched the student fall, seemingly in slow motion, I recalled how once before a student had collapsed due to an epileptic fit. I approached the student expecting to find similar symptoms. Even if he had lost consciousness, I thought it would have been from the fall. This hypothesis proved to be way off the mark, but it may have been why I was able to deal with the situation so calmly.

3.Student’s symptoms and my mental state during rescue

 The student did not respond to verbal cues and his limbs were like rubber. During the course of examining his condition I happened to check his radial pulse.

 One would expect a shiatsu therapist to have sensitive fingertips and be adept at palpation and pulse taking. I assessed that the pulse of the student in question was shallow, rapid, and weak. Rationally I knew that he did ‘have a pulse’, but the strange sensation conveyed to me through my fingers prompted me to take the following actions.

 We are trained that when a patient’s heart stops we should immediately call 119 emergency services and have someone bring an AED (Automated External Defibrillator), but in this case I was doubtful and asked fellow trainer ‘A’ to bring the AED without asking him to call 119. Instead of barking out the order as we were taught during training, I asked casually, saying something like “Anyway, maybe you’d better get the AED.” Fortunately another trainer ‘B’ had just come on shift and, having heard the word “AED”, grasped the situation immediately and rushed off to get the device. Even more helpful was the fact that, without my directly instructing him (I forgot to), he took in upon himself to call 119.

 As I awaited the arrival of the AED I observed the student carefully, thinking rationally on the one hand that he did ‘have a pulse’, but worried by the abnormal sensations conveyed to me through my fingertips. I was convinced that, logically, all we had to do was attach the AED and the voice message would confirm that there was nothing wrong. But the student’s complexion began to turn blue and I could feel his pulse gradually weaken. Whether it turned out to be a case of mere fainting or a serious case of cardiac arrest, I decided to play it safe and began performing cardiac massage. Having learned in class that, when chest compressions are performed properly, cardiac output is approx. 20 cc, I semiconsciously performed chest compressions with weak pressure that would produce less than 20 cc output. Reflecting on it later, I think the pressure reflected my mental state of wanting to ensure oxygenated blood reached the brain and heart, without risking any damage to the sternum, ribs, heart, or other organs.

 Eventually the AED arrived. The two of us applied the electrode pads together without regard to our training or the steps laid out in the manual and the automated analysis began. I awaited the ‘No shock required’ message, convinced even at this stage that it was just a case of fainting. I prayed for that message, which would mean that both the student and those of us performing the first aid could return to our peaceful routine.

 However, the message that came from the AED was the one I had heard in training: “Shock required.” When I heard that message a switch turned on inside me, a little too late perhaps, realizing that whatever happened we needed to save this student! From that point on, we made a point of following the manual and acting according to our training. Following the electric shock, we performed artificial respiration combined with chest compressions consisting of vertical compressions at least 5 cm deep at a rate of 120 per minute. After one or two minutes of that, a reaction something like agonal respiration occurred. Judging that it was agonal respiration, we continued chest compressions and artificial respiration until we decided that he was returning to normal breathing, at which point we placed him in the recovery position.

 After repositioning him, I continued to yell in his ear to hang in there and keep breathing, as they say that if you call someone as they are passing through death’s door, they will return to the land of the living.

4.Arrival of emergency rescue and transfer to hospital

 Coordination between the trainer who called 119, the athletics office, and the security station went smoothly, and I remember that the emergency rescue team arrived within seven minutes after the student had collapsed.

 Two rescue teams of three members each showed up. I don’t remember clearly whether the first team requested the second team or not. I explained the situation and the use of the AED to one of the paramedics while watching the activities of the first rescue team out of the corner of my eye. When the second rescue team began administering oxygen the student began to speak incoherently and it seemed like he was out of danger. But he was taken to the hospital before fully regaining consciousness.

 Just under 20 minutes passed from the time the incident occurred to the time the ambulance left. During that time, the teacher in charge of the class took care of the other students and accompanied the student who had collapsed. The other two trainers and I did what was necessary to restore the training area to normal operating conditions.

 While continuing normal open operations, we waited for the hospital where the student had been taken to contact us. This being the first time in my life I had ever performed CPR, I was relieved that the person had been resuscitated. However, looking back calmly on the incident once I had regained my composure, I began to worry: Was the pressure sufficient when I just used one hand? Did I wait too long before beginning chest compressions? And so on.

 Around 90 minutes after the incident occurred, we received a phone call from the teacher who had accompanied the student, saying that he had regained consciousness and was able to hold a simple conversation. I experienced the greatest sense of relief I had had since passing the national exams. Having received notification that the student regained consciousness, I returned home more than two hours later than usual.

5.Further developments

 Apparently, the hospital analyzed the data from the AED we had used. The manufacturer also inspected the battery and the unit was returned to us six days after the incident. As things continued to return to normal, I wondered what had become of the student and what had caused the problem. To counter my unease, I spent my days reading accounts of AEDs saving lives and surfing the Internet in search of information.

 Near the end of November, 50 days after the incident occurred, the student who had collapsed came to see me. When the incident occurred he had been exercising so of course was wearing gym clothes, so when he appeared before me smartly dressed in street clothes I at first didn’t recognize him. We spoke for just under half an hour, during which time he explained in detail how he only vaguely recalled the events surrounding the incident, how his release from hospital had been delayed for further testing and he had been transferred to another hospital, and that the cause had been due to a genetic disorder of which he had been unaware.

 I felt fortunate to have the opportunity to talk to him, considering that if I had saved the life of a passerby on the street they probably would not have paid me a visit to fill me in on all the details.

 He told me that he would be able to return to student life, and I conveyed the news to all related parties. I received a letter of appreciation from the fire marshal at the end of December, 70 days after the incident occurred, and one from the university president 20 days after that at the beginning of January. With this, I felt that in my heart that I had achieved closure.

6.Further ruminations and my perspective as a shiatsu therapist

 In Japan, the general public was first authorized to operate AEDs in July 2004. I received my anma, massage, and shiatsu certification in April of that year. Two years later, in June 2006, I took a course in standard first aid in Hiratsuka, where I was living at the time. I wasn’t really aware of it then, but at the time I took that first aid course it was still comparatively soon after AEDs had been authorized for general use. What I remember from the practical class was that the firefighter teaching the class thought highly of chest compressions. I still clearly remember mentioning while chatting to him during a break, “I’m a shiatsu therapist, so I have a good feel for performing perpendicular compressions.” In shiatsu terms, you might say that, while supporting the weight of you lower body with your knees, you apply hand-on-hand pressure with elbows extended, skillfully applying upper bodyweight to exert rhythmical pressure. Also, to push the comparison farther (perhaps too far?) you could say that the hand-on-hand pressure applied to the sternum using the heel of the palm is like fluid pressure, but without the flow.

 For manual therapists, touching other people’s bodies is a major premise of their work. Speaking subjectively, I feel that among manual therapists, shiatsu therapists are probably the most sensitive to the notion of perpendicular pressure. With the chest compressions of CPR, while one must press perpendicularly in order to ensure effective delivery of oxygen (blood), at the same time there is a risk of damaging the ribs and sternum. I was glad I had learned about and acquired the skills of ‘perpendicular compression’ at the time, and especially now that I have used it to actually save a person.

 As I mentioned earlier, I think shiatsu therapists also have good pulse palpation skills. In basic shiatsu, when one treats the axillary region, one palpates the radial pulse to determine if you are pressing on the right point. In the process of repeating this over and over, the various pulse feels of many different people accumulate in your fingertips like a medical chart. This may be why I was able to recognize the student’s irregular pulse.

 I realize that most shiatsu therapists are very busy with their day-to-day responsibilities, but I strongly recommend that everyone make the time to take a first aid course offered by the Red Cross or you local fire department. While the chances of being involved in a medical emergency are slim, proper training will not only help you handle the situation calmly, but will also provide an ideal opportunity to apply your skills as a shiatsu therapist.

 By the way, the feeling of practicing chest compressions on the doll used in the course is surprisingly similar to the feel of performing it on an actual person’s chest. I would like to express my respect and gratitude to the person who developed it.

7.Conclusion

 One year after the incident, I took a first aid course for the third time in my life. It’s certainly not because I was full of myself for having saved someone, but the instructor informed me that I was applying the electrode pads in the wrong position. I realized that, whether first aid or shiatsu, one needs to study every day to maintain one’s skills.

 It is not unimaginable that the skills one develops as a shiatsu therapist while coming into contact with people both spiritually and physically can be applied in a variety of situations, from nursing to childcare. It will make an interesting topic for further study.


References 

1. Ishizuka H: Shiatsu ryohogaku, first revised edition. International Medical Publishers, Ltd., 2008 (in Japanese)
2. Shimazaki S, editorial supervision; Tanaka H, editor: AED machikado no kiseki. Diamondo Bijinesu kikaku, 2010 (in Japanese)
3. Japanese Red Cross Society, editors: Sekijuji kyukyuho kiso koshu. Nisseki sabisu, 2012 (in Japanese)


随筆:いのちを救う押圧~指圧師が遭遇した救急救命の現場~:衞藤友親

1.はじめに

日本指圧専門学校のホームページに、卒業後の進路のひとつとしてスポーツトレーナーが紹介されています。

 私の場合は一般的にイメージされるスポーツトレーナーとは若干ニュアンスが異なりますが、一応トレーナーのはしくれとして生計を立てております。平成13年当時、すでにトレーナーとして体育実技の授業補助業務を担当していた私は、業務内容を充実すべく(そしてあわよくば学内で開業できないかとたくらみつつ)日本指圧専門学校に入学しました。卒業および資格取得後も学内の体育館にて授業補助を主とした業務を担当しています。業務内容は、体力測定の実施、結果集計、還元、解説、トレーニング指導、器具の使用法説明など様々です。指圧の技術が活きていないようにも見えますが、大学の仕事が今ほど忙しくなかった時には業務終了後に訪問治療を行っていたこともありました。また、各運動部の学生を対象に肩や腰の調子を指圧で整えたりもしています。

 そのような日々を過ごす中で、押圧操作を修練することで獲得した身体動作および知識が人命救助に繋がった事故の例を報告いたします。命の危機に瀕している人にそもそも遭遇しないことが平穏無事な人生ではありますが、万が一の事態に居合わせた時の参考にでもして頂ければ幸いです。

2.事故発生状況

 平成25年10月某日、16時過ぎからの授業に於いてある事故が発生しました。その日もごく普通に体力測定の授業補助業務を遂行し、受講者を数班に分けて反復横跳びの計測をしていました。反復横跳びは、1メートル間隔で引かれた3本のラインを20秒間で何回踏み越すもしくは踏むことができるかを計測する敏捷性のテストです。

 試技終了を告げる電子タイマーのブザー音と同時に学生がひとり倒れました。直前まで元気にステップしていたので、その勢いのまま受け身もとらず、まるで急に電源が切れたかのように身体が床に打ちつけられました。私は学生の後方に位置しタイマーの操作をしていました。(主観ではスローモーションのように)倒れていく学生を見ながら、過去に授業中にてんかん発作によって転倒した学生のことを思い出しました。今回もきっとそのような症状だろうと見込みながらその学生に近づきました。万が一気を失っていたとしても、転倒の衝撃によるものだろうとも見込みながら。この想定が結局は大はずれだったのですが、結果的には落ち着いて対処できる要因にも繋がったとも思えます。

3.当該学生の症状と救助時の心境

 呼びかけても返事をしないし、四肢は泥酔時のようにぐったりとしている。様子を観察すると同時並行の自然な流れで橈骨動脈を触診していました。
指圧師は指先の感覚が鋭敏であると思っています。また、人様の身体に触れ、脈をとるスキルにも長けていると思います。当該学生の脈は浅く速く弱く、理性では「脈あり」と判断していましたが、指先から伝わる違和感に突き動かされるように次の行動を起こしていました。

 訓練では心停止している患者に対してはすぐさま119番通報とAED(Automated External Defibrillator自動体外式除細動器)の手配を依頼するのですが、この時の私は半信半疑で、同僚のトレーナーA氏に対して119番通報ではなくAEDを持ってくるように指示を出しました。指示の出し方も訓練時の叫ぶような口調ではなく、「とりあえずAED持って来ましょうか?」的なのんきなものでした。幸いだったのは、たまたまシフトの都合でもう1名いた別のトレーナーB氏が「AED」の単語だけですべてを理解し迅速に行動して頂けたことです。結果的には直接指示を出していない(出し忘れた)119番通報までして頂けたので非常に助かりました。

 理性では「脈あり」、指先では「異常」を感じたままAEDの到着を待ち、当該学生を注意深く観察しました。理性では「AEDを装着しさえすれば、異常なしの音声が流れるはずだ」と固く信じていました。しかし、当該学生の顔色は徐々に蒼白となり、脈も徐々に弱まっていくように感じられました。単なる気絶でも重篤な心停止でもどちらに転んでもいいように、とりあえず片手での胸骨圧迫(心臓マッサージ)を開始しました。以前に講習にて、胸骨圧迫を正確に行った場合の心拍出量は約20ccであることを学んでいたので、およそ20cc以下程度の弱い押圧で胸骨圧迫をやってみようと半ば無意識に手が動いていました。あとから冷静に考察すると、胸骨、肋骨、心臓その他臓器を極力傷つけずに血中の酸素だけを脳と心臓に送りたかった心境が投影されての圧だったと思います。

 やがてAEDが到着し、訓練やマニュアルの手順とは異なり二人で手分けして電極パッドを装着し、自動解析がはじまりました。単なる失神であるとこの期に及んでも強く信じていたのでただひたすら「ショックの必要はありません」の音声を待ちました。そう告げてくれれば救助している我々にとっても当該学生にとっても平穏な日常が戻って来る、と祈りながら。

 ところがAEDからの音声指示は、訓練で聞きなれた「電気ショックが必要です」でした。その音声を聞いて、遅ればせながらこの時はじめて「絶対にこの学生を助けなければならない!」という強い意志へスイッチが切り替わりました。そこからはマニュアルに従い訓練通りの動きを意識的に行いました。電気ショックの後、最低5cm毎分120回のリズムで垂直に押す胸骨圧迫と人口呼吸を併用しました。その処置が1~2分経過したころ、死戦期呼吸のような反応がみられました。一応死戦期呼吸と判断して胸骨圧迫と人口呼吸を続け、正常な呼吸に近づきつつあると判断した時点で回復体位に体位変換しました。

 体位変換後も、俗に「三途の川を渡りかけている時は呼べばこちらの世界に返って来る」と言いますが、当該学生の耳元で頑張れとか呼吸しろとか、叫ぶように励まし続けていました。

4.救急隊到着から搬送

 119番通報をお願いしたトレーナーと体育事務室および守衛所の連携が円滑に行われ、救急隊が到着したのは学生が倒れてから7分以内であったのを覚えています。

 救急隊は3名ずつ都合2隊到着しました。先発隊の判断から後発隊が要請されたのか否かは明瞭には覚えていません。先発隊の処置を横目に見ながら、AEDの使用や状況の詳細を隊員に説明しました。後発隊の酸素吸入が開始されると、当該学生が不明瞭ながら声を発するようになり、状況からとりあえず危機的事態は脱したように感じ取れました。しかし、現場で当該学生の意識がしっかりと戻るのは確認できぬまま搬送されました。

 事故発生から搬送までの時間はおよそ20分弱くらいでした。その間、授業担当の先生には当該学生以外の受講生の対応などをしていただき、当該学生の付添もしていただきました。私を含めたトレーナー3名はトレーニング場を開放する通常業務に復旧すべく原状回復などを行いました。

 通常の開放業務を行いつつ、搬送先の病院からの連絡を待ちました。自分自身人生初の心肺蘇生法の実践がとりあえず蘇生の帰結を見たのには安堵していました。しかし、少し落ち着いてから冷静に顧みると、片手による圧迫は充分だったか?胸骨圧迫開始までの時間がかかりすぎていなかった?など、不安に思うことが増えていきました。

 事故発生から約90分後、病院に付き添った先生から当該学生の意識が回復し、簡単な会話ができるようになったとの電話連絡がありました。国家試験に合格した時以来の安堵感を覚えました。意識回復の連絡を受けて、その日は通常よりも2時間強遅く帰宅しました。

5.後日の顛末

 使用したAEDは病院で詳細に解析されたらしいです。加えて、メーカーによる電池残量の点検などを経て事故発生から6日後に返ってきました。平常を取り戻しつつも、当該学生のその後の様子や原因が気がかりでした。心のもやもや感を解消すべく、AEDによって命をとりとめた実例をまとめた書籍を読んだり、インターネット上の情報にあたったりしながら日々を過ごしました。

 事故発生から約50日後の11月下旬、倒れた学生本人が挨拶に来てくれました。倒れた時は当然体育の授業中で運動着姿でしたので、私服でしっかりとした足取りで来られた時は一瞬誰だったか思い出せませんでした。30分弱話をする中で、事故発生前後の記憶が曖昧であること、精密検査のため退院が遅れかつ転院したこと、本人も気づかなかった遺伝的な疾患が原因であったこと、などを丁寧に教えてくれました。

 もし街中で人命救助をしていたら、本人からこちらを訪ねて来て頂いて詳細に説明してくれはしないのではないか?と考えると、改めていろいろな不幸中の幸いに恵まれたのだな、と感じました。

 本人から無事に学生生活に復帰できそうだとの報告を受けて、関係各所にしかるべき連絡をいたしました。事故発生から約70日後の12月下旬に消防署長から、更にそれから20日後の1月上旬に学長から、それぞれ感謝状を賜りました。ここに至ってしっかり、はっきりと心の中の整理が決着した気がしました。

6.考察および指圧師として

 日本で一般市民によるAEDの使用が認められたのが平成16年7月です。私はその年の4月にあマ指師免許を取得しました。その2年後の平成18年6月に当時住んでいた平塚市で普通救命講習を受講しました。当時はそんなに意識していませんでしたが、AEDの一般使用が認められてから比較的早い段階で救命講習を受けていたことになります。実技講習の中で印象に残っているのが、ご指導いただいた消防署員から胸骨圧迫を褒められたことです。休憩中、その方との雑談の中で「僕は指圧師なので垂直に圧すコツはつかんでいます。」とお話しさせていただいたのは今でもはっきり覚えています。指圧界の言葉に訳すと、膝で下半身の体重を支え、重ね掌圧で肘を伸ばし、上半身の体重を上手に使いながらリズミカルに圧す、とでも言えましょうか。または、胸骨体に対する重ね掌圧による手掌基部を用いた流れない流動圧法、とも(無理矢理)言えなくもないでしょうか。

 手技療法士は他人様の身体に触れることが業務の大前提です。主観ですが、中でもとりわけ指圧師は「垂直に圧す」ことに関しては一番敏感であると思います。心肺蘇生法の胸骨圧迫は、垂直に圧さなければ有効に酸素(血液)が送れないのと同時に、肋骨・胸骨損傷のリスクがあるとされています。「垂直に圧す」ことを学び、習得していて良かったとその当時も思いましたし、実際に人を助けることができた今も思っています。

 先にも述べた通り、脈をとるスキルも指圧師は長けていると思います。基本指圧において腋窩を圧す時、ポイントをきちんと押さえられているか否かを確かめる手段として橈骨動脈を触診します。何回も繰り返し行えば、たくさんの人の様々な脈の様子が指先にカルテのように蓄積されていきます。異常な脈だと判断できたのもこのおかげだと思っています。

 日々の業務に追われて忙しいあマ指師の方々も多いとは存じますが、ぜひお近くの消防署や日本赤十字社が主催する救急法講習会を受講することを強くお勧めします。確率はかなり低いかもしれませんが、救急救命の現場に居合わせた時に慌てなくて済みますし、指圧師のスキルの応用としては親和性がかなり高いとお気づきになるはずでしょう。

 ちなみに講習で使われる人形は、胸骨圧迫の感触が実際の人間を圧迫したときの感触と驚くほど似ています。開発者の努力に頭が下がります。

7.おわりに

 事故発生から約1年後、生涯3度目となる救急法の講習を受講しました。人を助けたからといって決して驕っていたわけではないのですが、電極パッドを貼る位置などのズレをご指摘いただきました。救急法のスキルも指圧のスキルも、日々勉強してブラッシュアップしていく必要性を感じました。
 また、想像の範疇を超えませんが、精神的にも物理的にも人様と接触する指圧師のスキルは、介護や保育や生活の様々な場面で応用可能なはずです。いずれはそちら方面の研究もしてみたいです。


参考文献 

1) 石塚寛:指圧療法学 改訂第1版,国際医学出版,2008
2) 島崎修次 監修,田中秀治 編:AED 街角の奇跡,ダイヤモンド・ビジネス企画,2010
3) 日本赤十字社 編:赤十字救急法基礎講習,日赤サービス,2012 


随筆:花粉症施術の周辺事項:長谷川有基

長谷川有基
MTA指圧治療院

 一つテーマを決めて施術をして纏めるのはこんなにも大変かと思ったが、その分普段考えないようなことを考えることも色々とあった。個人的な考えが多く含まれるので、本文とは別に書いておきたい。

 施術にあたり、頚部と腹部を特に意識した。鼻閉は鼻粘膜の浮腫により鼻腔内が狭まった状態にある。主に血管透過性の亢進によるのだろうが、頚動脈鞘周りを弛めてやれば静脈還流が滞りなく行えて、浮腫は軽減するのではないか。また、腹部施術により細動脈を中心とした内臓の血管が広がって隅々まで血液が行き渡れば、結果的に頭頚部へ分布する血液は減り、さらに軽減するかもしれないと思ったからだ。しかしそう考えて、結果鼻閉が改善したからといって本当にその通りになったのかはわからない。上手くいったと思いたい。

 施術中や後の鼻閉については、首の角度と姿位による頚部の圧迫などの影響が考えられる。あるいは腹臥位での出現が多いことから、施術枕とフェイスタオルで顔の周りが塞がれて呼吸する空気の温湿度が変化したため、ということもありえる。なんにせよ、他の体位で施術すれば回避できるかもしれない。仰臥位での施術時に改善が多いから腹臥位から始めるのもいいかもしれない。今回は手順を統一するため、体位や順序を変えることはしなかった。

 気になったのは、症状の強いときほど首が硬く弛みにくく、仕事が多忙であったり疲労が強いほど症状も強くなるような印象を受けた。人間は全体で一つとして機能している。ある症状に対して、どこここを施術する、というよりも、いかに基礎的な全身状態の改善ができるかがポイントになるのかもしれない。そういった意味で、頚部の施術が自律神経系へ及ぼす影響だとか、首のとくに後ろ側が弛むと全身の抗重力筋などが弛むことは、全身の調整に役立っているのかもしれない。

  花粉症はⅠ型アレルギーに分類される。以前、Ⅰ型アレルギーは衛生仮説とTH1/TH2のバランスで説明されていた。大まかにいうと、乳幼児期の環境が清潔すぎるとエンドトキシンに触れる機会が減り、TH2が多くなりやすい。TH1とTH2のサイトカインはお互い拮抗して働き、TH2サイトカインはIgE産生を誘導するため、TH2優位だとアレルギーになりやすい、というもの。近年ではTH1/TH2に加え、TH17や制御性T細胞などのバランスやその他サイトカインが関連してくることがわかっている。

  指圧施術がこれらのどこかに影響を与えたのか、それとも前述の基礎的な全身状態が影響したのかわからない。もしアレルギー機序に影響したのならこれはなかなか面白くなってくる。

 今回の論文では症例数が少ないことを考えると、施術と全く関係ない理由で改善した、ということもないとはいえない。そういうことがあるためにできれば症例数は多いほうがいいが、現実にはなかなか難しい。仮に五十症例は欲しいとすると、1回1時間として1日8人ペースでも週6日はかかる。累積効果を見るためにある程度継続して全8〜12回、日常生活の個人差・変動に影響されにくいように受けるペースを週1回とすると、それだけで2〜3ヶ月はほぼ付きっ切りになってしまう。その間の生活や体調管理、被験者のスケジュール調整など考えると、個人ではかなり難しく大きな負担となる。論文を切っ掛けに実際に追試として施術を行っていただけるとありがたい。

 ある程度の集団で施術を行い、その結果を共有できる場を作れないかと思う。個人的にはできれば三桁くらいの症例は最低限欲しいし、追試の結果をフィードバックする場は必要だと思っている。しかし、薬の臨床試験とちがい、施術の方法や技量や刺激量の定量化などが難しい(○○kg重の圧で、などと強さを一定にする試みも見たことがあるが、これには少なくとも二つの問題がある。ひとつは刺激を受ける被験者の身体は同じではないので圧力を一定にするとむしろ強さが異なること、もうひとつはそもそも手技療法とはそういうものではないという根源的なものである。もしそういうものであったならば、マッサージ機器や医療用器具は今よりもっと違った形になっていただろう)。対照群を設定するとしても、偽薬のような物を使うわけにもいかないため、同じ時間ただ横になってもらう、という方法への理解も得にくいだろう。

 折角施術をして論文を書いたのだから多くの人に利用して欲しいし、より改善して良い物ものを作りたい気持ちもある。

 多忙や疲労は広い意味でストレスだが、ストレスとアレルギーの関連で言えば、TH1/TH2のアンバランスな状況をもたらす機序のひとつとして、ストレス刺激が挙げられている1)。 またストレスとの関連疾患では、潰瘍性大腸炎、リウマチ性関節炎(RA)などの自己免疫疾患が挙げられているのは興味深い2)。自己免疫疾患はTH17が自己抗原に反応して異常発達・増殖し、免疫システム全体のバランスが取れなくなった状態とも言われており、ストレスはTH17にも影響しているのかも知れない。

  神経系、内分泌系、免疫系は関連して機能している。ストレスはそれらに対しても影響を与える(ハンス=セリエ、ストレス反応)。人体をひとつのシステムと捉えれば、指圧施術が自律神経系に影響を与えたことで、他のサブシステムである内分泌系や免疫系へも影響を及ぼし、システム全体の機能が調整された、と考えることができる。しかし、起きた出来事はひとつだが説明のしかたは無数にあり、その説明が妥当かどうかはまた別の問題だ。裏付けがないという意味では、指圧で宇宙のパワーを注入しただとか、先祖の祟りが、などというのと変わらない(断っておくが、別に呪術を否定しているわけではない。呪術と医療が同一の時代もあったし、呪や念だとかはそれを扱うのが人間の心だということを考慮するとバカにはできない。ただ現代の医療というカテゴリーには適さないというだけである)。気が云々という説明の仕方もあるが、日本人は“気”というと内容が支離滅裂でも何となく判った気になってしまって納得してしまうところがあるので、使用する場面には話し手・聞き手の双方が注意を払う必要がある。

  指圧の研究やその方法が発展し、体内の変化を上手くモニタリングできれば、より事実に寄り添った説明ができる。煎じ詰めれば五十歩百歩だが、怪しげな理屈をこねなくて済むのは精神衛生上大変よろしい。

引用文献

 1)STEP内科1 神経・遺伝・免疫, 第3版, p.303, 海馬書房, 東京, 2010
 2)トートラ 人体の構造と機能 第2版, p.666, 丸善, 東京, 2008

参考文献

アレルギーは何故起こるか ヒトを傷つける過剰な免疫反応の仕組み 斉藤博久 講談社